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Oral administration of fermented red ginseng suppressed ovalbumin-induced allergic responses in female BALB/c mice

Lee, EJ;Song, MJ;Kwon, HS;Ji, GE;Sung, MK;
Product: Cholera Toxin (AZIDE-FREE) from Vibrio cholerae

Anti-allergic efficacy of red ginseng (RG) and fermented red ginseng (FRG) was evaluated. RG or FRG were administered to ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mice for 8 weeks. Immunoglobulins (Igs), Th1/Th2 type cytokines, and β-lactoglobulin (BLG) in serum, and intestinal barrier-related molecules in jejunum were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Mice sensitized with OVA increased serum IgG₁, IgE, OVA-IgG₁, and OVA-IgE. Both RG and FRG decreased serum IgE, OVA-IgE, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Serum BLG, a marker of gut permeability, was significantly higher in sensitized animals and was decreased in mice fed RG or FRG. In addition, intestinal barrier-related markers such as MMCP-1, IL-4, TNF-α, COX-2, and iNOS mRNA expressions were decreased by RG or FRG. Our results suggest in vivo anti-allergic activities of RG or FRG, which are associated with the regulation of Th1/Th2 balance, intestinal inflammation and subsequent the suppression of IgE.

PubMed ID: 22608480
247624762017-06-052017-06-0511:03:0311:03:032019-01-282019-01-2814:23:0814:23:08Lee, EJ;Song, MJ;Kwon, HS;Ji, GE;Sung, MK;Lee, EJ;Song, MJ;Kwon, HS;Ji, GE;Sung, MK;20122012Oral administration of fermented red ginseng suppressed ovalbumin-induced allergic responses in female BALB/c miceOral administration of fermented red ginseng suppressed ovalbumin-induced allergic responses in female BALB/c micePhytomedicine : International Journal Of Phytotherapy And PhytopharmacologyPhytomedicine : International Journal Of Phytotherapy And Phytopharmacology896-903896-903191910102260848022608480

Anti-allergic efficacy of red ginseng (RG) and fermented red ginseng (FRG) was evaluated. RG or FRG were administered to ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mice for 8 weeks. Immunoglobulins (Igs), Th1/Th2 type cytokines, and β-lactoglobulin (BLG) in serum, and intestinal barrier-related molecules in jejunum were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Mice sensitized with OVA increased serum IgG₁, IgE, OVA-IgG₁, and OVA-IgE. Both RG and FRG decreased serum IgE, OVA-IgE, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Serum BLG, a marker of gut permeability, was significantly higher in sensitized animals and was decreased in mice fed RG or FRG. In addition, intestinal barrier-related markers such as MMCP-1, IL-4, TNF-α, COX-2, and iNOS mRNA expressions were decreased by RG or FRG. Our results suggest in vivo anti-allergic activities of RG or FRG, which are associated with the regulation of Th1/Th2 balance, intestinal inflammation and subsequent the suppression of IgE.

Anti-allergic efficacy of red ginseng (RG) and fermented red ginseng (FRG) was evaluated. RG or FRG were administered to ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mice for 8 weeks. Immunoglobulins (Igs), Th1/Th2 type cytokines, and β-lactoglobulin (BLG) in serum, and intestinal barrier-related molecules in jejunum were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Mice sensitized with OVA increased serum IgG₁, IgE, OVA-IgG₁, and OVA-IgE. Both RG and FRG decreased serum IgE, OVA-IgE, and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Serum BLG, a marker of gut permeability, was significantly higher in sensitized animals and was decreased in mice fed RG or FRG. In addition, intestinal barrier-related markers such as MMCP-1, IL-4, TNF-α, COX-2, and iNOS mRNA expressions were decreased by RG or FRG. Our results suggest in vivo anti-allergic activities of RG or FRG, which are associated with the regulation of Th1/Th2 balance, intestinal inflammation and subsequent the suppression of IgE.

2.8772.877

... cholera toxin was from List Laboratories; ...

Intragastric antigen sensitization and treatment:

Sensitization was performed by 20 [micro]g OVA gavage with 10 [micro]g cholera toxin in 0.2 ml saline for 5 times once a week using a stainless steel blunt feeding needle. Mice in the non-sensitized control group received saline. Experimental diet included 0.1% or 0.3% red ginseng or fermented red ginseng. Mice were fed the experimental diet for 8 weeks starting at 1 week before the initial sensitization. ...

 

Author did not specify which Cholera toxin was utilized.  List Labs Product #101B/C - Cholera Toxin from Vibrio Cholerae has been discontinued; however, List Labs still provides Product #100B - Cholera Toxin (AZIDE-FREE) from Vibrio cholerae.  

To follow, are our recommendations for transitioning from Product #101B/C to Product #100B:

Product #101B, Cholera Toxin from Vibrio cholerae (1 mg), has been discontinued.  Product #100B, Cholera Toxin (AZIDE-FREE) from Vibrio cholerae, may be substituted for Product #101B, if the user accounts for the formulation differences.  Both products contain the same quantity of toxin per vial (1.0 mg).  For Product #100B, reconstitution with 1.0 mL of water results in a 1 mg/mL toxin solution in a buffer with the following component concentrations:  0.05 M Tris, 0.2 M NaCl, 0.001 M Na2EDTA at pH 7.5.  For Product #101B, reconstitution with half that amount of water (0.5 mL) resulted in a 2 mg/mL toxin solution with the same concentrations of the buffer components, and in addition, Product #101B contained 0.003 M NaN3.  The user may add the sodium azide preservative to product #100B, if desired.

Product #101C, Cholera Toxin from Vibrio cholerae (2 mg), has been discontinued.  Product #100B, Cholera Toxin (AZIDE-FREE) from Vibrio cholerae, may be substituted for #101C, if the researcher accounts for the formulation differences.  While Product #101C contained 2.0 mg per vial, Product #100 contains 1.0 mg per vial.  When Product #100B is reconstituted with 1.0 mL of water, the resulting 1 mg/mL toxin solution will have buffer components with the following concentrations:  0.05 M Tris, 0.2 M NaCl, 0.001 M Na2EDTA at pH 7.5.  For Product #101C, reconstitution with less than half that amount of water (0.4 mL) resulted in a 5 mg/mL toxin solution in the same buffer, and in addition, Product #101C contained 0.003 M NaN3.  The user may add the sodium azide preservative to product #100B, if desired. 

Large quantities of Product #101B or Product #101C may be obtained through Bulk Requests and Customer Orders

... cholera toxin was from List Laboratories; ...

Intragastric antigen sensitization and treatment:

Sensitization was performed by 20 [micro]g OVA gavage with 10 [micro]g cholera toxin in 0.2 ml saline for 5 times once a week using a stainless steel blunt feeding needle. Mice in the non-sensitized control group received saline. Experimental diet included 0.1% or 0.3% red ginseng or fermented red ginseng. Mice were fed the experimental diet for 8 weeks starting at 1 week before the initial sensitization. ...

 

Author did not specify which Cholera toxin was utilized.  List Labs Product #101B/C - Cholera Toxin from Vibrio Cholerae has been discontinued; however, List Labs still provides Product #100B - Cholera Toxin (AZIDE-FREE) from Vibrio cholerae.  

To follow, are our recommendations for transitioning from Product #101B/C to Product #100B:

Product #101B, Cholera Toxin from Vibrio cholerae (1 mg), has been discontinued.  Product #100B, Cholera Toxin (AZIDE-FREE) from Vibrio cholerae, may be substituted for Product #101B, if the user accounts for the formulation differences.  Both products contain the same quantity of toxin per vial (1.0 mg).  For Product #100B, reconstitution with 1.0 mL of water results in a 1 mg/mL toxin solution in a buffer with the following component concentrations:  0.05 M Tris, 0.2 M NaCl, 0.001 M Na2EDTA at pH 7.5.  For Product #101B, reconstitution with half that amount of water (0.5 mL) resulted in a 2 mg/mL toxin solution with the same concentrations of the buffer components, and in addition, Product #101B contained 0.003 M NaN3.  The user may add the sodium azide preservative to product #100B, if desired.

Product #101C, Cholera Toxin from Vibrio cholerae (2 mg), has been discontinued.  Product #100B, Cholera Toxin (AZIDE-FREE) from Vibrio cholerae, may be substituted for #101C, if the researcher accounts for the formulation differences.  While Product #101C contained 2.0 mg per vial, Product #100 contains 1.0 mg per vial.  When Product #100B is reconstituted with 1.0 mL of water, the resulting 1 mg/mL toxin solution will have buffer components with the following concentrations:  0.05 M Tris, 0.2 M NaCl, 0.001 M Na2EDTA at pH 7.5.  For Product #101C, reconstitution with less than half that amount of water (0.4 mL) resulted in a 5 mg/mL toxin solution in the same buffer, and in addition, Product #101C contained 0.003 M NaN3.  The user may add the sodium azide preservative to product #100B, if desired. 

Large quantities of Product #101B or Product #101C may be obtained through Bulk Requests and Customer Orders

https://www.thefreelibrary.com/Oral+administration+of+fermented+red+ginseng+suppressed...-a0308069055https://www.thefreelibrary.com/Oral+administration+of+fermented+red+ginseng+suppressed...-a03080690552012-07-152012-07-1510.1016/j.phymed.2012.04.00810.1016/j.phymed.2012.04.008Cholera Toxin (AZIDE-FREE) from Vibrio choleraeCholera Toxin (AZIDE-FREE) from Vibrio choleraemksung@sookmyung.ac.krmksung@sookmyung.ac.krAllergic;Anti;Antibodies;Assay;Barrier;Bead;Chain;Cholera;Cytokine;Efficacy;Enzyme;HRP;IgE;IgG;IL;Inflammation;Inflammatory;Linked;List;Mouse;mRNA;Permeability;Reaction;Regulation;TNF;Toxin;Transcription;Phytomedicine : International Journal Of Phytotherapy And PhytopharmacologyAllergic;Anti;Antibodies;Assay;Barrier;Bead;Chain;Cholera;Cytokine;Efficacy;Enzyme;HRP;IgE;IgG;IL;Inflammation;Inflammatory;Linked;List;Mouse;mRNA;Permeability;Reaction;Regulation;TNF;Toxin;Transcription;Phytomedicine : International Journal Of Phytotherapy And Phytopharmacology100B100Boral-administration-of-fermented-redoral-administration-of-fermented-red